Archive for the US Constitution Category

Sadly, The Ron Paul rEVOLution is Dead

Posted in 2008, Campaign, Constitution, Economy, Federal Reserve, GOP, income tax, Patriotism, President, Republican, Revolution, Ron Paul, Sovereignty, taxpayers, U.S. Government, United States, US Constitution, Voters, White House on February 6, 2008 by americanchaos

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Super Tuesday was a very interesting night. Mike Huckabee suprised everyone by winning West Virginia and by picking up a couple of states in the south.

The votes were all counted. The people have spoken.

Barack Obama made gains across the US. Hillary Clinton won the “prized” state of California as did McCain. Mitt Romney did not expect Mike Huckabee to do so well as he did tonight. Romney will probably have to think about what direction he needs to take his campaign.

Unfortunately for Ron Paul, tonight was not his night, in spite of how well he did placing second in the Nevada and Lousiana caucuses, he did not win in a single state.

Ron Paul is/was the dark horse internet hyped candidate of 2008. He seems to be out of luck now as the majority of delegates now are to be awarded to the other candidates.

Mike Gravel is still in the race, but his support is dwindling. It doesn’t seem that Ron Paul will get a chance to win the Republican nomination. The reality is if Ron Paul doesn’t have a chance at the Republican nomination for president, he more then likely won’t have a chance at the nomination for vice-president.

Ron Paul scored an average of 4 percent support nationwide, as a comparison in 1988 in the general election he polled at less then 1 percent nationwide, without the support of the todays techonology. It now seems without doubt that the “Ron Paul Revolution” is dead or has run out of steam.

What will the Ron Paul campaign do? What other tricks does it have up it sleeves? It has already used the unique idea of utilizing a blimp. It has already utilized the idea of using aerial forces to spread the message by flying around “blackout” areas where he was not allowed to debate. It has already used the viral force of the internet all to no avail.

To use a Biblical analogy, Saul slew his thousands, but David slew his tens of thousands.

Will Ron Paul’s current support dwindle in the light of the recent election numbers? What will his next steps be? We can only watch the news or check up online to see what will happen next.

Ron Paul has already said that he was 99.9% sure that he would not run as an Independent or as a Libertarian.

As a prediction, more then likely the internet and various media sources across the world will now focus their eyes on Obama, Clinton, McCain and Huckabee however fair or unfair as it may be, as the former candidates of 2008, and 2007 become relics of Alexa’s Wayback Machine and food for Google’s web crawling spiders.

Mitt Romney, Mike Gravel, and Ron Paul will have to put up one major fight in order to win any type of nomination. All in the short term seems unlikely.

Ron Paul is a good man, as are the other candidates, but the world is an unfair place to live.

In spite of negative things occurring in various campaigns, hopefully positive things will await us in the future. God help us.

http://blog.changeandexperience.com/2008/02/political-news-ron-paul-revolution-is.html

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Violence on the United States – Mexico Border

Posted in Anarchy, Anti American, assaults, Border Patrol, Border Security, Chertoff, Congress, crime, criminals, deportation, drug smuggling, Gang Activity, GOP, Hispanic, Homeland Security, homicide, human smuggling, identification requirements, illegal aliens, illegal immigration, Invaders, John McCain, Juan Hernandez, Latin American, Latino Arrogance, Law Enforcement, lawbreakers, Local Governments, McCain, Mexican, Mexican government, Mexican Reconquista, Mexico, military, Open Border, Politics, President, Reconquista, smugglers, South American, Sovereignty, terrorists, Treasonous, trespassers, U. S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Government, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, U.S.-Mexico border, Uncategorized, United States, US Border Patrol, US Constitution, violence on February 5, 2008 by americanchaos

By Sam Logan and M Casey McCarty

· Due to increased pressure from the Calderón administration, some members of Mexican organized crime may begin crossing the border in significant numbers to set up US-based operations.

Dozens of murders have resulted from battles between the Mexican security forces and armed criminals along the US-Mexico border since the beginning of this year. It is a spike in violence that has many in the US worried that gunfights may spill across the border, carrying all the reprisals that left a string of Mexican border towns without journalists, mayors, police chiefs and musicians in 2007.

In another bloody encounter for what has already been a violent year, on 7 January a van full of gunmen ran a roadblock outside the border town of Reynosa, Mexico. Mexican soldiers and federal police chased the van to a small house across the street from the Reynosa police station. The gun battle began soon after. In the aftermath, ten suspects were arrested and five policemen were dead. Along with the suspects, Mexican police seized three automatic rifles, an Uzi submachine gun, grenades and hundreds of rounds of ammunition.

The US Border Patrol has not taken any extra precautions, but is keeping its agents in the field “abreast of the situation,” according to Border Patrol spokesman Oscar Saldana, who recently spoke with ISN Security Watch.

“We’re advising everyone to be on the alert and be extra cautious because of the situation on the Mexican side,” he said.

Others, however, argue that more action must be taken to prevent the establishment of a significant presence of Mexican organized criminals inside the US. However, preparations on the US side of the border are directly linked to a lack of resources from the federal and state levels.

“What has been appropriated is likely spent,” Kent Lundgren, chairman of the National Former Border Patrol Organization, told ISN Security Watch in a recent telephone interview.

And what may come from the federal government in the future will almost certainly be delayed by the US presidential elections.

When the lives of officers are at stake, Lundgren said, law enforcement must prepare for the worst case scenario, which could be the possibility that a small group of armed men could cross the border and encounter a patrol cruiser. The resulting firefight would be no contest. The heavily armed Mexican criminals would easily overcome one or two Border Patrol agents most likely armed with only pistols.

“We have seen no indication that law enforcement in South Texas is prepared for the worse case in this matter,” he said.

Meanwhile, the Mexican government has shifted its posture from reactive to proactive. No longer interested in waiting for Mexican organized crime to strike before responding, Mexican President Felipe Calderón wants to hunt them down, starting with Los Zetas in the northeastern Mexican border state of Tamaulipas.

Los Zetas

Commonly known as the enforcement branch of a top tier Mexican drug trafficking organization (DTO) known as the Gulf Cartel, the founding members of this elite group of hit men are former Mexican soldiers who, once trained, left the rank and file to earn money protecting the black market economy.

During their tenure as a paramilitary force overseeing the transshipment of multiple tons of cocaine across the border into the US, Los Zetas was then given orders and controlled by Osiel Cardenas-Guillen, the former head of the Gulf Cartel now awaiting trial in the US.

The extradition of Cardenas in January 2007 caused a rift in his organization’s structure, removing the one power that had been able to contain Los Zetas and solidifying its status as the real power at the border.

Both before and after this change in leadership, the brazen nature of their attacks could be easily discerned from the day-to-day violence in Mexico. Some corpses left in the wake of a hit had the letter “Z” carved into their backs; standoffs in broad daylight against rival DTOs, police and/or military included hi-tech weaponry such as machine guns and RPGs. Newspapers refer to them as narco-soldiers due to their past military training. Their tactics are smooth and confident and their movements organized.

Los Zetas has seen their status exalted from that of hired goons to full-fledged gatekeepers. And the group is now likely a drug trafficking organization itself, having taken over the Gulf Cartel in a slow but steady process during 2007.

Formerly reserved for members of an elite enforcement unit, the term Zeta has begun to encompass members of the antiquated Gulf DTO, rendering the Gulf Cartel to little more than a name, with Los Zetas running the day-to-day operations from a ground-based standpoint.

Their numbers have been reported in the hundreds, but for Calderón there are now only two that matter. The reputed second in command of Los Zetas, Miguel Treviño Morales, is said to be running Nuevo Laredo’s daily operations, while Heriberto “El Verdugo” Lazcano (The Executioner) is said to be moving between Gulf-controlled cities in Tamaulipas to remain out of site.

It was reported that Lazcano was shot to death in October 2007, but he is now believed to be in the Gulf-controlled state of Tamaulipas, possibly the city of Tampico, the same seaside city where authorities seized 11 tons of cocaine in October 2007.

Manhunt

Rather than back off and acquiesce to the din of cries over human rights and increased violence in the wake of a bloody year, Calderón has stepped up the pressure on Los Zetas. He has focused on the state of Tamaulipas on the US-Mexico border where the group has the strongest presence, and where he can apply high pressure.

Considering that the Gulf Cartel’s headquarters is likely in the town of Rio Bravo, between McAllen and Brownsville, Texas, and that many of Los Zetas’ members are still in the state, the first step of Calderón’s operation was to use soldiers to make a literal cordon around the state.

With the Gulf of Mexico to the east and the US-Mexico border to the north, Calderón has focused on blocking the main roads in Tamaulipas that lead from the neighboring state of Nuevo Leon into the state of Coahuila with the help of some 2,300 Mexican soldiers, according to Patricio Patiño Arias, the deputy minister for intelligence and strategy at Mexico’s Ministry of Public Security.

The deputy minister acknowledges that their fight with Los Zetas has reached a new level of importance since the start of the New Year. Now it is a manhunt, and they are after Lazcano and Treviño, the latter believed to control the lucrative route from Monterrey to Nuevo Laredo, across the border from Laredo, Texas: one of the most hotly contested border crossings in all of Mexico.

Patiño Arias told reporters days after the 7 January shootout in Reynosa that the new strategy was “no longer just patrolling” but was now a direct fight “against specific objects, against specific targets that has grown out of important intelligence work.”

Holding the border

But will the border hold? This is a question not so much asked in Washington as in small towns and cities in southern Texas where locals read every day about violent shootouts occurring less than 16 kilometers away across a border that anyone can simply traverse on foot in many areas.

Blocked from escape in any direction but north, leaders and other members of Los Zetas could cross the border into the US as Calderón turns up the pressure in Tamaulipas. If Los Zetas begins running its smuggling operations from inside the US, law enforcement in small Texas towns across the border could be saddled with a serious security threat. But beyond the border, in cities such as Dallas and Houston, law enforcement will also likely feel the brunt of organized crime.

The ten gunmen arrested after the recent Reynosa shootout are all suspected members of Los Zetas, men who report to Treviño. Three of them have US citizenship, suggesting closer ties to the US, specifically Texas, than some may be willing to admit.

Limited resources

Sheriffs of border counties from El Paso to Brownsville, as well as members of the Texas Border Sheriffs Association, have come together to help one another along the Texas-Mexico border in an atmosphere where funds from the federal level are lacking.

“I could use another 50 officers,” Cameron County Sheriff Omar Lucio told ISN Security Watch, adding, “I have 1,267 square miles to cover. It’s an area larger than the state of Rhode Island.”

Lundgren, of the National Former Border Patrol Organization, believes that no local sheriff or lawman in Texas has the resources or the training necessary for the task. “We believe that in a limited set of circumstances there ought to be military resources on the border that can respond immediately when somebody is in over his head in what is essentially a large-scale firefight,” he said.

“There’s no reason why two border patrolmen or a sheriff’s deputy or anybody else should have to stand there and die just because we’re not prepared to send the troops over to take care of the bad guys in the way it should be done.”

http://www.mexidata.info/id1708.html

US Congress Supporting of Terrorist groups !

Posted in 2008, 2nd amendment, ACLU, Adopt-A-Highway, Ahmadinejad, al-Qaeda, America, American, American Citizens, American Freedom Riders, American people, American taxpayers, Americas Most Wanted, Amnesty, Anarchy, Anchor Babies, Andrew Thomas, Anti American, Antonio Bustamante, Arizona, Arizona-Mexico border, assault rifle, assaults, Assimilate, Austin Texas, Aztec, Aztlan, Barack Obama, beheadings, benefits, Bible, birth certificate, birthright, Border Angels, border crossing, Border Patrol, Border Security, Borderless Continent, boycott, Business, Business Licenses, California, Campaign, Canada, Catholic, Cemex, Central Texas, Chavez, Chertoff, Christians, Clinton, Congress, Constitution, consumers, contraband, coyotes, crime, criminal, criminals, Dallas County, Death, debate, defense record, Democratic, Democrats, Department of Transportation, deportation, Deported, DHS, disease, diseases, Documentary, Donald Rumsfeld, driver's license, Driving, drug dealer, drug smuggling, drug trade, drugs, Dual Citizen, Duncan Hunter, Dunce, east coast, Economists, Economy, Edwards, El Paso, El Salvador, elections, Ellis Island, employer sanctions, Employment, English language, false religion, Federal Debt, federal facilities, Federal Reserve, felony, Film, First Amendment, Flor Crisostomo, Florida, fortress, Free Trade Alliance, Freedom, Frosty Wooldridge, Fugitives, Funny, Gang, Gang Activity, GASTON CO, General David Petreaus’s, George Bush, George Soros, Georgia, Glenn Beck, Globalization, God, GOP, governor, green cards, Groundhog Day, GROWTH, Guantanamo Bay, Guest Workers, Guiliani, gun control, Hate, Heritage Foundation, Hezbollah, Hillary Clinton, Hispanic, History, home invasions, Homeland Security, homicide, housing, human rights, human smuggling, Humor, ICE, identification requirements, Illegal, Illegal Alien, illegal aliens, illegal immigration, immigration, income tax, Incursions, Indiana, INDIANAPOLIS, indigenous, Invaders, Islamic radicalism, Jackpot babies, Jail, Janet Napolitano, Jim Gilchrist, jobs, John McCain, Johnny Sutton, Juan Hernandez, judgment, Justice, Kennedy, kidnappings, killings, KKK, La Raza, Latin America, Latin American, Latino, Latino Arrogance, Law, Law Enforcement, lawbreakers, legal, legal documents, leprosy, Liberal, Liberty, license, Lieberman, Life, Local Governments, Lou Dobbs, Luis Aguilar, LULAC, Mara Salvatrucha, Maricopa County, Maverick, Mayor, McCain, MEChA, Media, medical care, Mestizos, Mexican, Mexican government, Mexican military, Mexican Police, Mexican Reconquista, Mexico, Michael Chertoff, Middle-eastern, migrants, Mike Huckabee, military, Minutemen, Mississippi, Money, MS-13, Multiculturalist, Murder, NAFTA, North American Union, Northern Border, NY, OBAMA, Oklahoma, Open Border, passport, Patrick J. Buchanan, Patriotism, pharmaceutical research, Phoenix, Pima County, Politics, population growth, POW, President, President Bush, pro-amnesty, protest, racism, Racist, Ramos and Compean, rape, Rape Trees, real estate, Recession, Reconquista, Religious leaders, Republican, Revolution, Rio Grande, Romney, Ron Paul, Ronald Reagan, San Diego, schools, Secure Fence Act of 2006, Senators, SEX, sex trafficking, Sexual Abuse, Sheriff Joe Arpaio, smugglers, social services, South American, Southern Arizona, Southwest, Sovereignty, Spanish, spending, state law, stolen cars, Suffolk County, Super Tuesday, syphilis, Tancredo, tax dollars, Taxes, Taxpayer, taxpayers, Ted Kennedy, terrorism, Terrorist, terrorists, Texas, The 14th Amendment, tickets, Tom Tancredo, trash, Travis County, Treasonous, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, trespassers, tuberculosis, Tucson, U. S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. border, U.S. citizen, U.S. Government, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, U.S.-Mexico border, United Nations, United States, Unsecured Borders, US Border Patrol, US Constitution, Venezuela, veterans, vigilantes, violence, Virginia, Voters, War, warrants, welfare, White House, wildlife, Yuma on February 4, 2008 by americanchaos


Why are we funding the VERY PEOPLE whom will and are trying to DESTROY US ?


1. La RAZA


2. MECha


3. Al Quida Jihad groups


4. Kair ( Islam group )



LA RAZA WILL GET $5 MILLION IN 2008 and $10 MILLION FOR EVERY YEAR AFTER THAT ! ! ! Hope Fund Act of 2007 (H.R. 1999) To authorize appropriations for assistance for the National Council of La Raza and the Raza Development Fund.

The Secretary of Housing and Urban Development shall, to the extent amounts are made available pursuant to subsection (b), make a grant to the National Council of La Raza for the purpose of providing technical and financial assistance to local non-profit organizations to undertake community development and affordable housing projects and programs serving low-and moderate-income households, particularly through organizations located in neighborhoods with substantial populations of income-disadvantaged households of Hispanic origin.

Assistance provided by the Secretary under this section may be used by the National Council of La Raza or the Raza Development Fund to–Provide technical and financial assistance for site acquisition and development, construction financing, and short-and long-term financing for housing, community facilities, and economic development; leverage capital from private entities, including private financial institutions, insurance companies, and private philanthropic organizations; provide technical assistance, training, support, and advice to develop the management, financial, and administrative capabilities of housing development organizations serving low-income households, including Hispanic households; And conduct such other activities as may be determined by the Secretary and the National Council of La Raza.( And this means ANY THING THEY WANT TO USE IT FOR!)

Authorization of Appropriations- There is authorized to be appropriated for grants under this section– $5,000,000 for fiscal year 2008; and $10,000,000 for each fiscal year thereafter. 4/23/2007: Referred to the House Committee on Financial Services. TELL THEM TO VOTE “NO” ON HOUSE RESOLUTION (HR) 1999!
HERE IS A TOLL-FREE NUMBER: 1(866)340-9281

Click Here
http://www.washingtonwatch.com/bills/show/110_HR_1999.html

Stop Funding for Illegal Immigrant Tuition

Posted in 2008, 2nd amendment, ACLU, Adopt-A-Highway, Ahmadinejad, al-Qaeda, America, American, American Citizens, American Freedom Riders, American people, American taxpayers, Americas Most Wanted, Amnesty, Anarchy, Anchor Babies, Andrew Thomas, Anti American, Antonio Bustamante, Arizona, Arizona-Mexico border, assault rifle, assaults, Assimilate, Austin Texas, Aztec, Aztlan, Barack Obama, beheadings, benefits, Bible, birth certificate, birthright, Border Angels, border crossing, Border Patrol, Border Security, Borderless Continent, boycott, Business, Business Licenses, California, Campaign, Canada, Catholic, Cemex, Central Texas, Chavez, Chertoff, Christians, Clinton, Congress, Constitution, consumers, contraband, coyotes, crime, criminal, criminals, Dallas County, Death, debate, defense record, Democratic, Democrats, Department of Transportation, deportation, Deported, DHS, disease, diseases, Documentary, Donald Rumsfeld, driver's license, Driving, drug dealer, drug smuggling, drug trade, drugs, Dual Citizen, Duncan Hunter, Dunce, east coast, Economists, Economy, Edwards, El Paso, El Salvador, elections, Ellis Island, employer sanctions, Employment, English language, false religion, Federal Debt, federal facilities, Federal Reserve, felony, Film, First Amendment, Flor Crisostomo, Florida, fortress, Free Trade Alliance, Freedom, Frosty Wooldridge, Fugitives, Funny, Gang, Gang Activity, GASTON CO, General David Petreaus’s, George Bush, George Soros, Georgia, Glenn Beck, Globalization, God, GOP, governor, green cards, Groundhog Day, GROWTH, Guantanamo Bay, Guest Workers, Guiliani, gun control, Hate, Heritage Foundation, Hezbollah, Hillary Clinton, Hispanic, History, home invasions, Homeland Security, homicide, housing, human rights, human smuggling, Humor, ICE, identification requirements, Illegal, Illegal Alien, illegal aliens, illegal immigration, immigration, income tax, Incursions, Indiana, INDIANAPOLIS, indigenous, Invaders, Islamic radicalism, Jackpot babies, Jail, Janet Napolitano, Jim Gilchrist, jobs, John McCain, Johnny Sutton, Juan Hernandez, judgment, Justice, Kennedy, kidnappings, killings, KKK, La Raza, Latin America, Latin American, Latino, Latino Arrogance, Law, Law Enforcement, lawbreakers, legal, legal documents, leprosy, Liberal, Liberty, license, Lieberman, Life, Local Governments, Lou Dobbs, Luis Aguilar, LULAC, Mara Salvatrucha, Maricopa County, Maverick, Mayor, McCain, MEChA, Media, medical care, Mestizos, Mexican, Mexican government, Mexican military, Mexican Police, Mexican Reconquista, Mexico, Michael Chertoff, Middle-eastern, migrants, Mike Huckabee, military, Minutemen, Mississippi, Money, MS-13, Multiculturalist, Murder, NAFTA, North American Union, Northern Border, NY, OBAMA, Oklahoma, Open Border, passport, Patrick J. Buchanan, Patriotism, pharmaceutical research, Phoenix, Pima County, Politics, population growth, POW, President, President Bush, pro-amnesty, protest, racism, Racist, Ramos and Compean, rape, Rape Trees, real estate, Recession, Reconquista, Religious leaders, Republican, Revolution, Rio Grande, Romney, Ron Paul, Ronald Reagan, San Diego, schools, Secure Fence Act of 2006, Senators, SEX, sex trafficking, Sexual Abuse, Sheriff Joe Arpaio, smugglers, social services, South American, Southern Arizona, Southwest, Sovereignty, Spanish, spending, state law, stolen cars, Suffolk County, Super Tuesday, syphilis, Tancredo, tax dollars, Taxes, Taxpayer, taxpayers, Ted Kennedy, terrorism, Terrorist, terrorists, Texas, The 14th Amendment, tickets, Tom Tancredo, trash, Travis County, Treasonous, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, trespassers, tuberculosis, Tucson, U. S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. border, U.S. citizen, U.S. Government, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, U.S.-Mexico border, Uncategorized, United Nations, United States, Unsecured Borders, US Border Patrol, US Constitution, Venezuela, veterans, vigilantes, violence, Virginia, Voters, War, warrants, welfare, White House, wildlife, Yuma on February 4, 2008 by americanchaos

Petition: There is a movement in government to give money to illegal immigrants’ college education. However, there are many U.S. Citizens who can not afford college. Keep our tax money for U.S. citizens.

Sign this Petition click here

Immigration Battle Divides Ariz. GOP

Posted in 2008, America, American Citizens, American taxpayers, Amnesty, Anchor Babies, Andrew Thomas, Anti American, Arizona, Arizona-Mexico border, Border Security, deportation, Economy, employer sanctions, GOP, Hispanic, identification requirements, illegal aliens, illegal immigration, Jackpot babies, John McCain, Juan Hernandez, Latino, Latino Arrogance, Law, Law Enforcement, Maricopa County, Mexican Reconquista, Open Border, Patriotism, Phoenix, Politics, POW, protest, Reconquista, Sheriff Joe Arpaio, Southwest, Sovereignty, Super Tuesday, trespassers, U.S. Government, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, U.S.-Mexico border, Uncategorized, United States, US Constitution, Voters on February 3, 2008 by americanchaos

Many Activists Despise McCain

By Joel Achenbach

Carolyn Nilsen, 53, and Jim Markins, 73, protest outside a McDonald's restaurant on Bell Road in North Phoenix where day laborers gather.
Carolyn Nilsen, 53, and Jim Markins, 73, protest outside a McDonald’s restaurant on Bell Road in North Phoenix where day laborers gather. (Photos By Joel Achenbach — The Washington Post)
PHOENIX — The protesters gather every morning before dawn, monitoring the entrance to a fenced compound called the Macehualli Work Center. They are trying to shut the place down. They wave placards and take photos of anyone driving in to pick up the day laborers who congregate there. They want nothing less than to save America from what they call “the invasion.”

“Most of us don’t feel safe on the Phoenix streets without being armed,” says Wes Pecsok, a contractor who keeps his pistol in an inner vest pocket. “We’re not going to be intimidated by these thugs. “The protesters are members of the Minutemen, Riders USA, United for a Sovereign America. They find a common bond in their rage, their fury at the government, their loathing of Hispanics who have come to the United States illegally. They say that many immigrants carry disease, and kill cops, and rape children.

“We’re the Wild West,” protester Craig Tillman says with a smile.

The Wild West is actually a rather ordinary-looking, heavily commercialized artery called Bell Road. Mexico is a three-hour drive south of here, but Bell Road and places like it are where the worlds collide, one culture grinding against the other. And in the home state of Sen. John McCain, the front-runner for the Republican presidential nomination, that clash has driven a wedge straight through the Arizona GOP.

The party is controlled at the district level by activists who detest McCain for his sponsorship, with Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.), of a comprehensive immigration bill that among other things would have provided illegal immigrants with a pathway to citizenship. They think McCain is a traitor to conservative causes and an advocate for amnesty for illegal immigrants.

“We do not consider him a conservative at all,” says Rob Haney, a Republican Party chairman in McCain’s home district. The candidate’s bus, the Straight Talk Express, should be renamed, Haney says: “We call it the Forked Tongue Express around here. He’ll lie about anything.”

Said John Acer, a lawyer who, like Haney, showed up last weekend at a meeting of the Republican state committee in Glendale: “He’s despicable. Dishonest. Duplicitous.” And so it goes, on and on, all these Republicans who wince at the mention of McCain’s name, and who can think of few things worse than having the state’s senior Republican senator ascend to the White House.

McCain is likely to win the state’s Republican primary on Tuesday. He wins elections here in Arizona easily. Party activists don’t control the Republicans in voting booths any more than they control the senior senator. But McCain’s in-state problems reflect his national quandary as he tries to convince American conservatives that he’s one of them.

Once home to Barry Goldwater, Arizona has a credible claim as the birthplace of modern American conservatism. But even Goldwater, late in life, found himself at odds with many conservatives in the state who laced the ideology with social issues that had nothing to do with low taxes and small government.

“I feel badly that, with a lot of these people, Barry Goldwater would be unwelcome,” says Grant Woods, a moderate Republican and former Arizona attorney general. “I would hope for Arizona’s future in the Republican Party is that it would continue to produce leaders of the caliber of Goldwater, of Sandra Day O’Connor, of John McCain; yet if this posture continues, from the state party, you won’t see those leaders come from within the party anymore. Because no one in their right mind would deal with these people.”

At the GOP meeting, a few volunteers staffed a McCain table, passing out fliers listing misconceptions about McCain — playing defense in hostile territory.

Lou Borland, 51, a member of Riders USA, wears a bulletproof vest at a protest against illegal immigrants outside a work center in Phoenix. The battle over immigration has divided the Arizona GOP.
Lou Borland, 51, a member of Riders USA, wears a bulletproof vest at a protest against illegal immigrants outside a work center in Phoenix. The battle over immigration has divided the Arizona GOP. (Joel Achenbach – Twp)
Haney, probably the most vociferous of McCain’s critics, patrolled the hallway wearing a little button on his lapel that read “McCain 2008” and had a slash through it. He agreed that Goldwater today wouldn’t get his vote: “He’s pro-abortion, pro-homosexual agenda,” Haney said. And he says he sees little difference between McCain and Democrat Hillary Rodham Clinton on the immigration issue. “He’s for open borders. He’s for amnesty. Hillary’s for amnesty.”

Nearby sat a man wearing a McCain button — no slash. Horst Kraus, 77, said he immigrated from Germany in 1960. He owns a nudist camp in Arizona (and says the conservative Republicans outnumber everyone else by 2 to 1). The immigration rhetoric scares him.”I see 1938 all over again,” Kraus said. “Back then it was ‘Jews, raus’ ” — Jews, out.

“Now it’s ‘Mexicans, out,’ ” he said. “I am very disturbed by it.”

On Bell Road, that fear is shared by the many Hispanics who work or shop at the car lots, pawnshops, liquor stores, furniture stores and check-cashing operations that line the highway, one of the main drags in North Phoenix.

“It’s scary,” says Mary Torres, 39, who works at a thrift shop.

“There’s a hatred for rising Hispanic communities in Arizona. They don’t want little L.A.‘s in Arizona,” says co-worker Barbara Gutierrez, 40.

“A lot of people are going to other states. Even Canada,” Torres said.

“Less controversy. Less pressure,” Gutierrez said.

Max Romero, 41, proprietor of John’s Olde Barber Shop — a Hispanic-oriented business with “peluqueria” stenciled on the front window — says that most of his customers are more focused on the Super Bowl than on Super Tuesday. But he makes a prediction about Sen. Barack Obama (D-Ill.):

“I think that light-skinned brother’s going to win. Because Oprah backs him up. The senator for us, McCain, he just seems so senile. He don’t make no sense. Homeboy’s young.”

In the parking lot, men congregated around the back of a pickup truck, apparently hoping to get hired. More men gathered on a distant street corner. The day laborer center where the protests are held was vacant. The demonstrations have effectively shut the place down, scattering the workers.

Protester Barb Heller says she wears a mask to protect herself against tuberculosis.
Protester Barb Heller says she wears a mask to protect herself against tuberculosis. (By Joel Achenbach — The Washington Post)
A state law that took effect Jan. 1 heightens penalties on business owners who hire illegal immigrants. The consequences have yet to play out, but some proprietors on Bell Road say business is down as Hispanics either save their money or flee the state, to points unknown. Some people worry that crime will spike. And people are frightened.The manager of a liquor store, a Palestinian man who gave his name only as John, said the crackdown on employers is going to have terrible consequences among the Hispanics who live in the area. They’ll do “crazy stuff,” he predicted.

“They’re not going to go back to Mexico! There’s no jobs there!”

Down the road on a side street next to the McDonald’s where the protesters have gathered, Tillman said he’d never vote for McCain, or for any of the Democrats.

Rusty Childress, founder of United for a Sovereign America, said he hopes a television personality will come to the rescue: “Our hope would be that you’d get Lou Dobbs jumping in at the last minute.”

Barb Heller said she fears what amounts to an annexation of parts of Arizona by the Mexican government: “The president of Mexico is saying that wherever there is a Mexican, that’s Mexico.”

She showed up for Saturday’s protest with a surgical mask around her neck. “No TB please” was written on it.

A Hispanic man approached on the far side of the street. She put the mask on. She said she does it whenever someone might be carrying tuberculosis. Illegal immigrants don’t have to pass health tests before getting jobs, she says. They might be working right there at McDonald’s, she said.

“Do you know what it takes to spread TB? Would you like a little TB with your Happy Meal?”

She knows what people say about the protesters.

“They say, ‘Why are you racist?’ That’s all they can come up with,” she said.

Noon approached, and the demonstrators began to pack up their placards. They’d be back in the morning.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/02/01/AR2008020103260.html?wpisrc=rss_print

U.S. Chamber of Commerce Attacks Oklahomans’ Demand for Rule of Law

Posted in American taxpayers, Border Security, criminals, deportation, Economy, employer sanctions, illegal aliens, illegal immigration, Invaders, Law Enforcement, lawbreakers, Oklahoma, Open Border, Sovereignty, state law, U.S. Government, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, US Constitution, Voters on February 2, 2008 by americanchaos

U.S. Chamber fights 1804

By OMER GILLHAM World Staff Writer

It’s joined other associations suing Oklahoma over the immigration reform law.

OKLAHOMA CITY — The U.S. Chamber of Commerce has joined forces with the Oklahoma City and Tulsa chambers to sue the state over its immigration reform law.

The U.S. Chamber filed for an injunction Friday in U.S. District Court for the Western District of Oklahoma.

The lawsuit targets specific aspects of House Bill 1804. Among other things, the new law creates state barriers to hiring illegal immigrants, requires proof of citizenship to receive certain government benefits and makes it illegal to knowingly transport illegal immigrants.

Through the injunction, the U.S. Chamber is seeking to stop the implementation of two sections of the measure.

The lawsuit challenges a requirement that employers doing business with the state use the federal government’s voluntary experimental program for verifying work eligibility.

It also challenges require ments for businesses to verify the work authorization status of individual independent contractors to avoid state tax penalties.

The injunction alleges that the challenged sections of the law are pre-empted by federal law and are unconstitutional under the Supremacy Clause of the U.S. Constitution.

In a prepared statement, the U.S. Chamber said: “The organizations supporting the in junction explained that the lawsuit focuses on those provisions of HB 1804 which impose unreasonable burdens on Oklahoma businesses and puts them at a disadvantage compared to competitors in other states, and that HB 1804 puts businesses in the impossible position of having to comply with conflicting federal and state laws.”

The primary author of HB 1804 said the lawsuit is a poor attempt at changing state law.

“This is just another in a long series of attempts by the pro-illegal alien lobby and their allies who rely on cheap illegal labor and who try to accomplish through the judicial system what they were unable to do through the Legislature,” said Randy Terrill, R-Moore.

“Their moral dilemma is that they are in the position of supporting the functional equivalent of modern-day slavery.”

The organizations supporting the injunction noted that their participation in the lawsuit does not equate to support for illegal immigration.

Additionally, the U.S. Chamber and the other chambers narrowed the focus of their requested injunction because some aspects of 1804 appear to be acceptable.

“The Tulsa region is outpacing the rest of the nation in job growth,” said Mike Neal, president and CEO of the Tulsa Metro Chamber. “Oklahoma’s HB 1804 requires our businesses to police immigration issues through an erroneous system, reduces the pool of legal workers and harms the ability of Oklahoma businesses to grow.”

The defendants in the injunction are Gov. Brad Henry, Attorney General Drew Ed mondson, members of the Oklahoma Human Rights Commission and members of the Oklahoma Tax Commission.

Charlie Price, spokesman for the attorney general, said: “It is the attorney general’s duty to defend the constitutionality of state statutes and we will do that in this case.”

Others joining the U.S. Chamber and the Oklahoma City and Tulsa chambers in the lawsuit are the Oklahoma State Chamber of Commerce, Oklahoma Restaurant Association, and Oklahoma Hotel and Lodging Association.

Portions of HB 1804 went into effect in November, while other portions affecting private sector employers take effect in July.

The law has withstood two legal challenges in federal court in Tulsa and faces another filed in state district court.

http://www.tulsaworld.com/news/article.aspx?subjectID=12&articleID=20080202_1_A1_hItsj23352

Guadalupe Hidalgo Day

Posted in America, Border Security, Groundhog Day, illegal aliens, illegal immigration, Liberty, Mexican military, Mexican Reconquista, Mexico, Politics, Sovereignty, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, U.S. Government, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, US Constitution, War on February 2, 2008 by americanchaos

By Allan Wall

Aside from being Groundhog Day and Candlemas, February 2nd is also the 160th anniversary of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo . It was this treaty, signed in 1848 in Mexico , that officially ceded most of the Southwest to the U.S.A.
Given that the anniversary is sometimes used byreconquista-types and fellow travelers, and that most Americans don’t know much about it, I invite readers to peruse my article, published a year ago, entitled “On Guadalupe Hidalgo Day, Here’s Why the U.S. Has Title to the Southwest”,
Far from being a mere historical curiosity, it’s a topic that, given today’s climate, is likely to be brought up again and again.

On Guadalupe Hidalgo Day, Here’s Why The U.S. Has Title To The Southwest

The Second Annual “National March for Immigrant Rights” is scheduled to be held on the U.S.-Mexico border on February 2nd.

Last year, the march was also held on February 2nd.

What’s going on here? Why February 2nd?

Answer: February 2nd is the anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. That 1848 treaty officially ended the Mexican War and legally turned over most of the Southwest to the United States.

The average American doesn’t know much about the Mexican War and thinks about it less.

But here in Mexico they do think about it—a lot.

In Mexico, everybody knows that “the U.S. took half our national territory.

La Intervención Norteamericana has been described—by Mexican writer and Nobel laureate Octavio Paz—as “one of the most unjust wars of conquest in history.

Not only that, but the loss of Mexico’s northern territories has been used as a reason—an excuse, really—for the economic failures of Mexico compared to the economic success of the United States.

According to at least one poll, conducted in 2002 by Zogby in Mexico, 58% of respondents agreed with the statement that “the territory of the United States’ Southwest rightfully belongs to Mexico”. [MS Word] Now that’s definitely a different perspective.

In a lighter vein, some Mexicans jokingly quip that, when the U.S. took half of Mexico’s territory, we took the half with the paved roads.

Some Americans are shocked to learn that Mexicans actually have a different historical perspective than we do.

How dare Mexicans say the U.S. took the Southwest from Mexico? How dare they have a different perspective than us?

It’s time for a reality check. Different nations have different historical perspectives on the same historical events. That’s one reason they are different nations.

Of course Mexicans say that the U.S. took (or even “stole”) the Southwest! Why wouldn’t they?

We’ve got to get over this naïve belief that everybody in the world has the same values, and that everybody wants to be just like us.

Maybe we should have thought twice about importing millions of people from the only country on earth with an irredentist claim against us—and then encouraging them not to assimilate!

It’s not that the facts of the war are in dispute. A Mexican historical text and an American historical text provide the same facts about the war. It’s just that the “spin” is different. (And nowadays, some of the American treatments of the war are more critical of the war than the Mexican ones.)

Even some of the arguments used on our side are a little lame.

Some try to prove the territory wasn’t conquered. After all, we did pay $15 million dollars for it.

True, but that makes it sound like a garden variety real estate deal. Mexico was soundly defeated, and as defeated nations throughout history, had to abide by the terms of defeat.

It was a conquest. And historically there’s nothing unique about that. Just about every country in the world was formed by some type of conquest and just about all the real estate in the world has been conquered and re-conquered, some of it quite a few times.

That includes Mexico. The contemporary conventional Mexican view is that the evil Spaniards conquered Mexico. But when Hernan Cortes arrived in 1519, the present-day country of Mexico did not exist. The Aztec Empire (itself a product of conquest) only covered about a quarter of present-day Mexico. After the Spaniards conquered that empire, they went on conquering numerous other indigenous entities, including the Tarascan Empire, enemy of the Aztec Empire, thus assembling the enormous colony of Nueva España, which was renamed Mexico after independence. Furthermore, throughout the history of independent Mexico, the government has repeatedly used force to subdue rebellious tribes and areas and keep them in Mexico. So yes, Mexico was formed by conquest as well.

Nor is invading a neighbor country at all rare. In fact, it’s the most common form of international invasion there is.

And supposing the Mexican War hadn’t started in 1846, it’s quite probable Mexico would have lost the territories anyway.

The region in question was far from the heartland of Mexico, and sparsely settled. Neither the Spanish Empire nor the independent Mexico which succeeded it did much to develop the area, which was prone to frequent anti-government uprisings.

In the 1840s, there was speculation that the British, the French or the Russians might take try to take it.

But the most likely possibility would have been that growing communities of unassimilated American settlers would have revolted, seceded from Mexico, and joined the U.S.

It was the Texas dispute that provoked the Mexican War. Americans had settled in Texas, they didn’t assimilate, they became the majority, and seceded from Mexico in 1836.

That was not the first time that Mexico lost territory. Upon independence in 1821, Central America had been part of Mexico, but Mexico lost that territory in the 1820s. Funny, I never hear about a Mexican “reconquista” of Central America.

The Republic of Texas was independent from 1836 to 1845, during which time it was diplomatically recognized by the U.S., France, Britain, Holland and Belgium, and Mexico was unable to get it back.

After Texas joined the Union in 1845, the dispute erupted again. Both countries sent troops into the disputed territory between the Rio Grande (which Texas said was the border) and the Nueces River (which Mexico said was the border). In April 1846, the two armies clashed in the Thornton Skirmish, followed by several battles in May of 1846, after which President Polk asked for and received a declaration of war from Congress. Three months later the Mexican Congress reciprocated.

Nowadays, of course, the war is seen as the attack of a strong U.S.A. upon a weak and peaceful Mexico.

But at the time, both countries were about equally hawkish and ready for war. Mexico had a larger full-time military (27,000 Mexican men under arms vs. a U.S. Army of about 7,000 soldiers—a number which soon swelled when volunteers flocked to join).

Nowadays, the idea of conquest is very unPC. But in 1846, neither the U.S. nor Mexico was against the idea of conquest in principle. It’s just that each country wanted to be the conqueror and not the conquered.

Mexico’s government planned an invasion of the U.S., predicting that as Mexico invaded, the slaves would revolt and the Mexican flag would fly over the U.S. capitol in Washington. The Mexican government planned to annex parts of the United States, in the Louisiana/Alabama region. What a plan!

But they didn’t have the chance to do all that, because the U.S. Army invaded Mexico first. (Maps are available here and here.)

Brigadier General Zachary Taylor (“Old Rough and Ready”) invaded and occupied part of northeastern Mexico, including the city of Monterrey, which fell after a fierce battle involving house-to-house combat, in September of 1846. After the battle of Buena Vista (February of 1847), conventional war in that theater was over, though there were guerrilla attacks against U.S. forces.

In another prong of the invasion, Colonel Stephen Kearny marched west from Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, taking Santa Fe and arriving in California. There Kearney linked up with Captain John C. Fremont and some of those unassimilated American settlers who had already declared independence from Mexico. On July 7th, 1846, the Navy landed and did its part. By February of 1847 fighting in this theater was over.

Mexico had still refused to surrender. So President Polk sent an invasion force to take Mexico City. This expeditionary force, under the command of General Winfield Scott (“Old Fuss and Feathers”) landed at Veracruz, on Mexico’s Gulf Coast, and carried out the largest American amphibious landing up to that time.

Veracruz was taken in March 1847. Then the U.S. Army fought its way inland to Mexico City, taking the same route [Map] as Hernan Cortes in 1519.

Among the soldiers who fought under General Scott was a member of the Indiana Volunteers by the name of Robert Wall—my first cousin 4 times removed, the first member of my family to go to Mexico. After returning to Indiana, for the rest of his life my kinsman was known as “Mexican Bob”. Mexican Bob had two cousins also named Robert Wall— a funny cousin known as “Monkey Bob” and a feisty one known as “Spunky Bob”. Spunky Bob was my great-great-grandfather.

With the fall of Mexico City in September of 1847, major combat operations were over, although in both Taylor’s and Scott’s occupation zones, there were continued enemy attacks on U.S. supply convoys—just as in Iraq today.

Why did the American army defeat the Mexican army?

The American army, composed 100% of men who had volunteered, was better trained and better equipped, had its own supply convoys and medical personnel to care for the wounded. The U.S. Army’s artillery was a decisive factor— each cannon’s crew was overseen by a seasoned NCO known as “chief of the piece.” (See illustration here.)

The Mexican army was mostly composed of draftees, had Napoleonic-era weapons, and sometimes left its wounded behind, not a great morale inducer. The classic Mexican history work México Á Través De Los Siglos points out that, though the Mexican soldiers in the rank and file were brave,

“…the mutual confidence between the leaders and officers did not exist, the weaponry was old and defective, the artillery was small and of short range, the cavalry was mostly useless, the movements were slow and heavy, and finally, ambulances and supplies of provisions and everything necessary for the good service of an army on campaign were lacking.”(México Á Través De Los Siglos Vicente Riva Palacio, 1880).

Mexico’s loss was also due to internal disunity. In the face of the American invasion, Mexico’s leaders did not form a government of national unity and work together to defend their country.

Instead, Mexican leaders often seemed more concerned with maneuvering against each other than against the enemy. In December of 1845, with war imminent, General Mariano Paredes was sent north with an army to face off against the Americans. But on the way, he changed his mind and decided instead to return to Mexico City and overthrow the government.

That’s how the more hawkish Paredes became president, replacing Jose Joaquin de Herrera, who was willing to compromise on the Texas issue. In August of 1846, Paredes himself was deposed by Mariano Salas. The presidency actually changed hands four times that year and by March of 1847, Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna was in charge of both the government and the military. He resigned after the Mexico City defeat of 1847.

Also during the war, the Mexicans had an internecine dispute about church property, an attempt to install a Spanish monarch, and about 35 uprisings throughout the country. Some Mexican communities didn’t support the war effort, and had no qualms about trading with the American enemy. Others were simply indifferent and stayed out of it.

The Yucatan Peninsula, which had been independent from 1841-1843, declared independence again on January 1st, 1846 and announced its neutrality during the Mexican War. But the indigenous Maya revolted against Yucatan’s white elite in the Caste War, which broke out in 1847. The whites were forced to retreat into the walled cities of Merida and Campeche in 1848. After the U.S. withdrew from Mexico, Yucatan’s leaders rejoined Mexico. It began a long drawn out reconquest of the Maya territory which didn’t end until 1901.

The Mexican War had its contemporary American critics, mostly among the Whig party. Critics of the war included former president John Quincy Adams, John C. Calhoun, Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau who spent a night in jail because he refused to pay a $1 tax in protest.

Abraham Lincoln opposed the use of the Thornton Skirmish as justification for the war, although he still voted for funds to supply the U.S. Army in Mexico, and later supported Zachary Taylor’s presidential campaign.

Among the 200 junior officers in the war who wound up being generals (Union and Confederate) in the Civil War, was future president Ulysses S. Grant, who at some point in his life decided that the war was evil.

But whatever Lincoln and Grant thought about the Mexican War, as president, neither man offered to give the conquered territories back to Mexico.

When Mexican leaders signed the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848, they were almost out of money and the country was on the verge of a revolution. American troops had defeated the Mexican army, were occupying strategic parts of the country, and negotiator Nicholas Trist made clear that without a transfer of the territories, there would be no treaty. So the Mexican leaders decided to sign the treaty to avoid greater losses. It was signed on February 2nd, 1848 and ratified by both congresses several months later. The U.S. Army withdrew from all the territory it was occupying except the newly-annexed territories.

In the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, the U.S. gained nearly all the Southwest,—all of California, Nevada and Utah, and parts of Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico and Wyoming. (The area south of the Gila River in the present-day states of Arizona and New Mexico, was purchased from Mexico in the Gadsden Treaty of 1853.)

So the Southwest is part of the U.S. and has been for over 150 years, longer than most present-day national states have been in existence.

Even the Mexican Constitution doesn’t claim the Southwest! That’s right. The Mexican Constitution, in articles 42—48 [Word Document] spells out the extent of Mexican territory. It mentions Mexican islands, continental shelf, and airspace, Mexico’s 31 states and federal district, but it never mentions California, Texas or Arizona.

So take that, you reconquistas!

When reflecting upon the Mexican War, some Americans ask why we didn’t just annex the whole country. And there were actually people in favor of that—the “All Mexico” movement. But there were several reasons that didn’t happen.

One was America’s North-South divide, especially the congressional balance between free states and slave states, with northerners fearing that Mexico would be divided into slave states and thus upset the balance.

But John C. Calhoun and others opposed annexing Mexico for National Question reasons.

In 1848, the U.S. population was about 21 million, and the population of Mexico about 7 million, a third of ours. How well could we have assimilated 7 million Mexicans, with all the racial, cultural, social, nationalistic differences that would have been involved? Annexing Mexico would have changed the character of our nation.

Ironically, today’s leaders have no such qualms. Today our leaders apparently see no problem in merging us with Mexico, despite the differences between our societies.

They are merging our countries on several levels. At one level is the mass migration of Mexicans into the U.S. coupled with a multicultural ideology which encourages non-assimilation and retention of their Mexican identity. At another level, inter-governmental agreements are moving us closer to some sort of North American Union.

It’s a century and a half after Guadalupe Hidalgo. Who will be the winners in this century?

Will it be the U.S.A., Mexico—or a transnational elite, for whom all the residents of our continent are just interchangeable pieces in a vast market?

The next few years will give us the answer.

http://www.vdare.com/awall/070201_memo.htm

American citizen Allan Wall (email him) resides in Mexico, with a legal permit issued him by the Mexican government. Allan recently returned from a tour of duty in Iraq with the Texas Army National Guard. His VDARE.COM articles are archived here; his FRONTPAGEMAG.COM articles are archived here his “Dispatches from Iraq” are archived here his website is here.